Text Size:AAA

tPA Protein, Antibody, ELISA Kit, cDNA Clone

Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
10157-H01H1-10
10157-H01H1-20
10 µg / $178
20 µg / $298
Add to Cart
Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
10157-H01H2-10
10157-H01H2-20
10 µg / $178
20 µg / $298
Add to Cart
Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
10157-HNCH2-10
10157-HNCH2-20
10 µg / $178
20 µg / $298
Add to Cart
Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
50910-M01H1-10
50910-M01H1-20
10 µg / $178
20 µg / $298
Add to Cart

tPA Related Areas

tPA Related Pathways

tPA Related Product

    tPA Summary & Protein Information

    tPA Background

    Gene Summary: PLAT gene encodes tissue-type plasminogen activator, a secreted serine protease which converts the proenzyme plasminogen to plasmin, a fibrinolytic enzyme. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized as a single chain which is cleaved by plasmin to a two chain disulfide linked protein. This enzyme plays a role in cell migration and tissue remodeling. Increased enzymatic activity causes hyperfibrinolysis, which manifests as excessive bleeding; decreased activity leads to hypofibrinolysis which can result in thrombosis or embolism. Alternative splicing of this gene results in multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]
    General information above from NCBI
    Catalytic activity: Specific cleavage of Arg-|-Val bond in plasminogen to form plasmin.
    Enzyme regulation: Inhibited by SERPINA5.
    Subunit structure: Heterodimer of chain A and chain B held by a disulfide bond. Forms a heterodimer with SERPINA5. Binds to fibrin with high affinity. This interaction leads to an increase in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme between 100-fold and 1000-fold, due to an increase in affinity for plasminogen. Binds to annexin A2, cytokeratin-8, fibronectin and laminin. Binds to mannose receptor and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1); these proteins are involved in TPA clearance. Yet unidentified interactions on endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) lead to a 100-fold stimulation of plasminogen activation. In addition, binding to VSMC reduces TPA inhibition by PAI-1 by 30-fold. Binds LRP1B; binding is followed by internalization and degradation.
    Domain: Both FN1 and one of the kringle domains are required for binding to fibrin.
    Both FN1 and EGF-like domains are important for binding to LRP1.
    The FN1 domain mediates binding to annexin A2.
    The second kringle domain is implicated in binding to cytokeratin-8 and to the endothelial cell surface binding site.
    Subcellular location: Secreted, extracellular space.
    Tissue specificity: Synthesized in numerous tissues (including tumors) and secreted into most extracellular body fluids, such as plasma, uterine fluid, saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, tears, seminal fluid, and milk.
    Post-translational: The single chain, almost fully active enzyme, can be further processed into a two-chain fully active form by a cleavage after Arg-310 catalyzed by plasmin, tissue kallikrein or factor Xa.
    Differential cell-specific N-linked glycosylation gives rise to two glycoforms, type I (glycosylated at Asn-219) and type II (not glycosylated at Asn-219). The single chain type I glycoform is less readily converted into the two-chain form by plasmin, and the two-chain type I glycoform has a lower activity than the two- chain type II glycoform in the presence of fibrin.
    N-glycosylation of Asn-152; the bound oligomannosidic glycan is involved in the interaction with the mannose receptor.
    Characterization of O-linked glycan was studied in Bowes melanoma cell line.
    Involvement in disease: Note=Increased activity of TPA results in increased fibrinolysis of fibrin blood clots that is associated with excessive bleeding. Defective release of TPA results in hypofibrinolysis that can lead to thrombosis or embolism.
    Sequence similarity: Belongs to the peptidase S1 family.
    Contains 1 EGF-like domain.
    Contains 1 fibronectin type-I domain.
    Contains 2 kringle domains.
    Contains 1 peptidase S1 domain.
    General information above from UniProt

    Tissue plasminogen activator (abbreviated tPA or PLAT), is traditionally viewed as a simple serine protease whose main function is to convert plasminogen into biologically active plasmin. As a protease, tPA plays a crucial role in regulating blood fibrinolysis, in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular matrix and in modulating the post-translational activation of growth factors. tPA is synthesized and secreted as a single chain polypeptide precursor which is cleaved in turn by plasmin. Proteolytic cleavage at the C-terminal side of Arg275 generates the enzyme composed of two subunits, designated as α and β chains which are held together by a single disulfide bond. Unlike the other members of the chymotrypsin family, tPA has one particular distinction in that the catalytic efficiency of the single-chain enzyme is only slightly lower than that of the proteolytically cleaved form and is therefore not a true zymogen. tPA is found not only in the blood, where its primary function is as a thrombolytic enzyme, but also in the central nervous system (CNS). It participats in a number of physiological and pathological events in the CNS, as well as the role of neuroserpin as the natural regulator of tPA's activity in these processes. Increased or decreased activity of tPA leads to hyperfibrinolysis or hypofibrinolysis, respectively. In addition, as a cytokine, tPA plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of renal interstitial fibrosis through diverse mechanisms. Thus, as a fibrogenic cytokine, it promotes the progression of kidney diseases.

    tPA Alternative Name

    tPA Related Studies

  • Yepes M, et al. (2004) New functions for an old enzyme: nonhemostatic roles for tissue-type plasminogen activator in the central nervous system. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 229(11): 1097-104.
  • Samson AL, et al. (2006) Tissue-type plasminogen activator: a multifaceted modulator of neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Neuron. 50(5): 673-8.
  • Skrzypiec AE, et al. (2008) Tissue plasminogen activator in the amygdala: a new role for an old protease. J Physiol Pharmacol. 59 Suppl 8: 135-46.
  • Hu K, et al. (2008) Novel actions of tissue-type plasminogen activator in chronic kidney disease. Front Biosci. 13: 5174-86.
  • Please note: All products are "FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND ARE NOT INTENDED FOR DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USE"