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Human APP qPCR primer pairs

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Human APP qPCR Product Information
Gene Synonym:APP, AAA, AD1, PN2, ABPP, APPI, CVAP, ABETA, CTFgamma
PCR_SIZE (bp):
QPCR Primer Description:Verified forward and reverse primers for analyzing the quantitative expression of gene
Quality Control:The primer mix has been verified to generate satisfactory qPCR data on Roche LightCycler480
Shipping_carrier:1 vial of lyophilized qPCR primer mix (1 nmol each primer, sufficient for 200 numbers of 25 μl reactions) is shipped at ambiente temperatura.
Storage:The lyophilized product is stable for one year from date of receipt when stored at -20℃.
The suspended product is stable for six months from date of receipt when stored at -20℃.
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Sino biological qEASY qPCR primer pairs are used for SYBR Green-based real-time RT-PCR, The primers are designed by using SBI's proprietary primer design algorithm. Our primer collection covers the entire human genomes. It can be widely applied in the quantitative analysis of gene expression.

Unique Primer Design

To avoid genomic DNA amplification, at least one primer is designed crosses the junction of exons according to the conserved region of a specific gene with all variants.

Strict Validation Process

Confirmed in positive organizations; screened the primer with high specificity and high sensitivity.

Uniform PCR conditions, Saving time and cost

~100% amplification curve, ensuring the accuracy of the RNA quantitative

Amyloid beta A4 protein Background

Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein expressed in many tissues and concentrated in the synapses of neurons, and is suggested as a regulator of synapse formation and neural plasticity. APP can be processed by two different proteolytic pathways. In one pathway, APP is cleaved by β- and γ-secretase to produce the amyloid-β-protein (Aβ, Abeta, beta-amyloid) which is the principal component of the amyloid plaques, the major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while in the other pathway, α-secretase is involved in the cleavage of APP whose product exerts antiamyloidogenic effect and prevention of the Aβ peptide formation. The aberrant accumulation of aggregated beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) as plaques is a hallmark of AD neuropathology and reduction of Abeta has become a leading direction of emerging experimental therapies for the disease. Besides this pathological function of Abeta, recently published data reveal that Abeta also has an essential physiological role in lipid homeostasis. Cholesterol increases Abeta production, and conversely A beta production causes a decrease in cholesterol synthesis. Abeta may be part of a mechanism controlling synaptic activity, acting as a positive regulator presynaptically and a negative regulator postsynaptically. The pathological accumulation of oligomeric Abeta assemblies depresses excitatory transmission at the synaptic level, but also triggers aberrant patterns of neuronal circuit activity and epileptiform discharges at the network level. Abeta-induced dysfunction of inhibitory interneurons likely increases synchrony among excitatory principal cells and contributes to the destabilization of neuronal networks. There is evidence that beta-amyloid can impair blood vessel function. Vascular beta-amyloid deposition, also known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy, is associated with vascular dysfunction in animal and human studies. Alzheimer disease is associated with morphological changes in capillary networks, and soluble beta-amyloid produces abnormal vascular responses to physiological and pharmacological stimuli.

Human Amyloid beta A4 protein References
  • Grimm MO, et al. (2007) Amyloid beta as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. Trends Mol Med. 13(8): 337-44.
  • Smith EE, et al. (2009) Beta-amyloid, blood vessels, and brain function. Stroke. 40(7): 2601-6.
  • Gouras GK, et al. (2010) Intraneuronal beta-amyloid accumulation and synapse pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Acta Neuropathol. 119(5): 523-41.
  • Palop JJ, et al. (2010) Amyloid-beta-induced neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease: from synapses toward neural networks. Nat Neurosci. 13(7): 812-8.
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    Catalog: HP100882
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