Quick Order

ADSL / Adenylosuccinate Lyase Antibody, Rabbit MAb

DatasheetSpecific ReferencesReviewsRelated ProductsProtocols
Human ADSL Antibody Product Information
Immunogen:Recombinant Human ADSL / Adenylosuccinate Lyase protein (Catalog#11287-H07E)
Clone ID:007
Ig Type:Rabbit IgG
Concentration:
Endotoxin:
Formulation:0.2 μm filtered solution in PBS
Preparation:This antibody was obtained from a rabbit immunized with purified, recombinant Human ADSL / Adenylosuccinate Lyase (rh ADSL / Adenylosuccinate Lyase; Catalog#11287-H07E; P30566-1; Met1-Leu484).
Human ADSL Antibody Usage Guide
Specificity:Human ADSL / Adenylosuccinate Lyase
Application:WB, IHC-P, IP

WB: 2-5 μg/ml

IHC-P: 0.5-5 μg/mL

IP: 1-4 μg/mg of lysate

Storage:This antibody can be stored at 2℃-8℃ for one month without detectable loss of activity. Antibody products are stable for twelve months from date of receipt when stored at -20℃ to -80℃. Preservative-Free.
Sodium azide is recommended to avoid contamination (final concentration 0.05%-0.1%). It is toxic to cells and should be disposed of properly. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
Other ADSL Antibody Products
ADSL / Adenylosuccinate Lyase Background

Adenylosuccinate lyase, also known as adenylosuccinase, ADSL or ASL, is an enzyme implicated in the reaction of adenylosuccinat converting to AMP and fumarate as part of the purine nucleotide cycle. The two substates of adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) are dephosphorylated derivatives of SAICA ribotide (SAICAR) and adenylosuccinate (S-AMP), which catalyzes an important reaction in the de novo pathway of purine biosynthesis. ADSL catalyzes two distinct reactions in the synthesis of purine nucleotides, both of which involve the _-elimination of fumarate to produce either aminoimidazole carboxamide ribotide from SAICAR or AMP from S-AMP. The Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the present of SAICA riboside and succinyladenosine (S-Ado). ADSL defect in different patients is often caused by different mutations to the enzyme.

Human ADSL / Adenylosuccinate Lyase References
  • Nassogne M, et al. (2000) Adenylosuccinase deficiency: an unusual cause of early-onset epilepsy associated with acquired microcephaly. Brain and development. 22 (6): 383-6.
  • Sivendran S, et al. (2004) Two novel mutant human adenylosuccinate lyases (ASLs) associated with autism and characterization of the equivalent mutant Bacillus subtilis ASL. J Biol Chem. 279 (51): 53789-97.
  • Lee TT, et al. (1999) His68 and His141 are critical contributors to the intersubunit catalytic site of adenylosuccinate lyase of Bacillus subtilis. Biochemistry. 38 (1): 22-32.
  • Product nameProduct name
    Please note: All products are "FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND ARE NOT INTENDED FOR DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USE"