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Rat SERPING1 natural ORF mammalian expression plasmid

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Rat SERPING1 cDNA Clone Product Information
Gene_bank_ref_id:XM_006234447.1
RefSeq ORF Size:1515bp
cDNA Description:Full length Clone DNA of Rattus norvegicus serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade G (C1 inhibitor), member 1.
Gene Synonym:Serping1
Species:Rat
Vector:pCMV3-untagged
Plasmid:
Restriction Site:
Tag Sequence:
Sequence Description:
Sequencing primers:T7(TAATACGACTCACTATAGGG) BGH(TAGAAGGCACAGTCGAGG)
Promoter:Enhanced CMV mammalian cell promoter
Application:Stable or Transient mammalian expression
Antibiotic in E.coli:Ampicilin
Antibiotic in mammalian cell:Hygromycin
Shipping_carrier:Each tube contains lyophilized plasmid.
Storage:The lyophilized plasmid can be stored at room temperature for three months.
Product nameProduct name
Background

Plasma protease C1 inhibitor, also known as C1-inhibiting factor, C1-INH, C1 esterase inhibitor, SERPING1 and C1IN, is a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that regulates activation of both the complement and contact systems. By its C-terminal part (serpin domain), characterized by three beta-sheets and an exposed mobile reactive loop, C1-INH binds, and blocks the activity of its target proteases. The N-terminal end (nonserpin domain) confers to C1-INH the capacity to bind lipopolysaccharides and E-selectin. Owing to this moiety, C1-INH intervenes in regulation of the inflammatory reaction. The heterozygous deficiency of C1-INH results in hereditary angioedema (HAE). Owing to its ability to modulate the contact and complement systems and the convincing safety profile, plasma-derived C1 inhibitor is an attractive therapeutic protein to treat inflammatory diseases other than HAE. Deficiency of C1 inhibitor results in hereditary angioedema, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of localized angioedema of the skin, gastrointestinal mucosa or upper respiratory mucosa. C1 inhibitor may prove useful in a variety of other diseases including septic shock, reperfusion injury, hyperacute transplant rejection, traumatic and hemorrhagic shock, and the increased vascular permeability associated with thermal injury, interleukin-2 therapy and cardiopulmonary bypass.

References
  • Davis AE 3rd. et al. (2004) Biological effects of C1 inhibitor. Drug News Perspect. 17(7): 439-46.
  • Cicardi M, et al. (2005) C1 inhibitor: molecular and clinical aspects. Springer Semin Immunopathol. 27(3): 286-98.
  • Wouters D, et al. (2008) C1 inhibitor: just a serine protease inhibitor? New and old considerations on therapeutic applications of C1 inhibitor. Expert Opin Biol Ther. 8(8): 1225-40.
  • Cugno M, et al. (2009) C1-inhibitor deficiency and angioedema: molecular mechanisms and clinical progress. Trends Mol Med. 15(2): 69-78.
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    Catalog: RG81647-UT
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    Please note: All products are "FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND ARE NOT INTENDED FOR DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USE"