After search, choose a molecule or a kind of categories listed in the left to narrow down your filter. If you have any problems, please contact us!
Text Size:AAA

Human HMGB1 / HMG1 Human Cells Transfected Lysate (positive control) (denatured)

DatasheetSpecific ReferencesReviewsRelated ProductsProtocols
HMGB1Transfected / Overexpression Cell Lysate Product Information
Product Description:Human Cells transfected lysate in which Human HMGB1 / HMG1 has been over-expressed. The whole cell lysate is provided in 1X Sample Buffer (1X modified RIPA buffer+1X SDS sample buffer).
Preparation Method:Cell lysate was prepared by homogenization in ice-cold modified RIPA Lysis Buffer with cocktail of protease inhibitors (Sigma). Cell debris was removed by centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined with Bradford assay (Bio-Rad protein assay, Microplate Standard assay). The cell lysate was boiled for 5 minutes in 1 x SDS sample buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl pH 6.8, 12.5% glycerol, 1% sodium dodecylsulfate, 0.01% bromophenol blue) containing 5% b-mercaptoethanol, and lyophilized.
Lysis Buffer:Modified RIPA Lysis Buffer: 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 1mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% SDS, 1% Sodium deoxycholate, 1mM PMSF
Quality Control Testing:12.5% SDS-PAGE Stained with Coomassie Blue
Stability:Samples are stable for up to twelve months from date of receipt at -80℃
Recommend Usage:1. Centrifuge the tube for a few seconds and ensure the pellet at the bottom of the tube. 2. Re-dissolve the pellet using 200μL pure water and boiled for 2-5 min. 3. Store it at -80℃. Recommend to aliquot the cell lysate into smaller quantities for optimal storage. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Notes:The lysate is ready to load on SDS-PAGE for Western blot application. If dissociating conditions are required, add reducing agent prior to heating.
Storage Buffer:In modified RIPA Lysis Buffer
Storage Instruction:Store at -80℃. Aliquot to avoid repeated freezing and thawing
Application notes:WB: Use at an assay dependent dilution.
Not yet tested in other applications.
Optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.

High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), also known as HMG-1 or amphoterin previously, is a member of the HMGB family consisting of three members, HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3. HMGB1 is a DNA-binding nuclear protein, released actively following cytokine stimulation as well as passively during cell death. It is the prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule and has been implicated in several inflammatory disorders. HMGB1 signals via the receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) and members of the toll-like receptor (TLR) family. The most prominent HMGB1 protein and mRNA expression arthritis is present in pannus regions, where synovial tissue invades articular cartilage and bone. HMGB1 promotes the activity of proteolytic enzymes, and osteoclasts need HMGB1 for functional maturation. As a non-histone nuclear protein, HMGB1 has a dual function. Inside the cell, HMGB1 binds DNA, regulating transcription and determining chromosomal architecture. Outside the cell, HMGB1 can serve as an alarmin to activate the innate system and mediate a wide range of physiological and pathological responses. Extracellular HMGB1 represents an optimal "necrotic marker" selected by the innate immune system to recognize tissue damage and initiate reparative responses. However, extracellular HMGB1 also acts as a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that contributes to the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory and infectious disorders. HMGB1 has been successfully therapeutically targeted in multiple preclinical models of infectious and sterile diseases including arthritis. As shown in studies on patients as well as animal models, HMGB1 can play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and polymyositis among others. In addition, enhanced postmyocardial infarction remodeling in type 1 diabetes mellitus was partially mediated by HMGB1 activation.

  • Ulloa L, et al. (2006) High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein: friend and foe. Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 17 (3): 189-201.
  • Pisetsky DS, et al. (2008) High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1): an alarmin mediating the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease. Arthritis Res Ther. 10 (3): 209.
  • Volz HC, et al. (2010) The role of HMGB1/RAGE in inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Semin Thromb Hemost. 36(2): 185-94.
  • Sims GP, et al. (2010) HMGB1 and RAGE in inflammation and cancer. Annu Rev Immunol. 28: 367-88.
  • Andersson U, et al. (2010) The role of HMGB1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1799 (1-2): 141-8.
  • Size / Price
    List Price: $195.00  (Save $0.00)
    Price:$195.00      [How to order]
    Availability2 weeks
      Recently Viewed Items