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SerpinA1 Protein, Antibody, ELISA Kit, cDNA Clone

Description: Active
Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
10306-H08H-10
10306-H08H-20
10 µg / $178
20 µg / $298
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Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
80476-R08H-10
80476-R08H-50
10 µg / $178
50 µg / $448
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SerpinA1 Related Areas

SerpinA1 Related Pathways

SerpinA1 Related Product

    SerpinA1 Summary & Protein Information

    SerpinA1 Background

    Gene Summary: The protein encoded by this gene is secreted and is a serine protease inhibitor whose targets include elastase, plasmin, thrombin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and plasminogen activator. Defects in this gene can cause emphysema or liver disease. Several transcript variants encoding the same protein have been found for this gene
    General information above from NCBI
    Domain: The reactive center loop (RCL) extends out from the body of the protein and directs binding to the target protease. The protease cleaves the serpin at the reactive site within the RCL, establishing a covalent linkage between the carboxyl group of the serpin reactive site and the serine hydroxyl of the protease. The resulting inactive serpin-protease complex is highly stable.
    Subcellular location: Secreted.
    Short peptide from AAT: Secreted, extracellular space, extracellular matrix.
    Tissue specificity: Plasma.
    Post-translational: N-glycosylated. Differential glycosylation produces a number of isoforms. N-linked glycan at Asn-107 is alternatively di- antennary, tri-antennary or tetra-antennary. The glycan at Asn-70 is di-antennary with trace amounts of tri-antennary. Glycan at Asn-271 is exclusively di-antennary. Structure of glycans at Asn- 70 and Asn-271 is Hex5HexNAc4. The structure of the antennae is Neu5Ac(alpha1-6)Gal(beta1-4)GlcNAc attached to the core structure Man(alpha1-6)[Man(alpha1-3)]Man(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-4)GlcNAc. Some antennae are fucosylated, which forms a Lewis-X determinant.
    Proteolytic processing may yield the truncated form that ranges from Asp-30 to Lys-418.
    Involvement in disease: Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) [MIM:613490]: A disorder whose most common manifestation is emphysema, which becomes evident by the third to fourth decade. A less common manifestation of the deficiency is liver disease, which occurs in children and adults, and may result in cirrhosis and liver failure. Environmental factors, particularly cigarette smoking, greatly increase the risk of emphysema at an earlier age. Note=The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry.
    Sequence similarity: Belongs to the serpin family.
    General information above from UniProt

    SerpinA1, also known as Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), is a prototype member of the Serpin superfamily of the serine protease inhibitors. This serine protease inhibitor blocks the protease, neutrophil elastase. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is mainly produced in the liver and acts as an antiprotease. Its principal function is to inactivate neutrophil elastase, preventing tissue damage. SerpinA1 (alpha1-antitrypsin), an acute phase protein and the classical neutrophil elastase inhibitor, is localized within lipid rafts in primary human monocytes in vitro. It association with monocytes is inhibited by cholesterol depleting/efflux-stimulating agents (nystatin, filipin, MbetaCD (methyl-beta-cyclodextrin) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and conversely, enhanced by free cholesterol. Furthermore, SerpinA1/monocyte association per se depletes lipid raft cholesterol as characterized by the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2, formation of cytosolic lipid droplets, and a complete inhibition of oxLDL uptake by monocytes. Previous population studies have suggested that heterozygote status for the AAT gene (SerpinA1) is a risk factor for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP). Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SerpinA1 gene, and has numerous clinical implications. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disease affecting the lung and liver. In the liver, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency may manifest as benign neonatal hepatitis syndrome; a small percentage of adults develop liver fibrosis, with progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Its most important physiologic functions are the protection of pulmonary tissue from aggressive proteolytic enzymes and regulation of pulmonary immune processes.

    SerpinA1 Alternative Name

    A1A,A1AT,AAT,MGC23330,MGC9222,PI,PI1,PRO2275,SERPINA1, [human]
    Aat,Pre,Pre-1,Serpina1,Spi1,Spi-1, [mouse]

    SerpinA1 Related Studies

  • Khnlein T, et al. (2008) Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. Am J Med. 121(1): 3-9.
  • Camelier AA, et al. (2008) Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment. J Bras Pneumol. 34(7): 514-27.
  • Subramaniyam D, et al. (2010) Cholesterol rich lipid raft microdomains are gateway for acute phase protein, SERPINA1. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 42(9): 1562-70.
  • Kilty SJ, et al. (2010) Polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 (Alpha-1-Antitrypsin) gene are associated with severe chronic rhinosinusitis unresponsive to medical therapy. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 24(1): e4-9.
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