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Mast Cell

Sino Biological offers a comprehensive set of tools for mast cell related research, including recombinant proteins, antibodies, ELISA kits, and ORF cDNA clones.

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    Mast Cell Background

    Mast cells are generated in the bone marrow, and scattered throughout the connective tissues. Mast cells are very similar to basophil granulocyte. Both cell types are developed from CD34+ precursor cells, and they have many similar characteristics. For example, both mast cells and basophils store histamine, a chemical that is secreted by the cells when stimulated in certain ways. And they play a central role in inflammatory and immediate allergic reactions. They are able to release potent inflammatory mediators, such as histamine, proteases, chemotactic factors, cytokines and metabolites of arachidonic acid that act on the vasculature, smooth muscle, connective tissue, mucous glands and inflammatory cells. Both mast cells and basophils contain special cytoplasmic granules which store mediators of inflammation. The extracellular release of the mediators is known as degranulation. Mast cells are capable of producing a vast array of important cytokines and other inflammatory mediators and thus play a critical role in innate immunity. Mast cells are also involved in tumor angiogenesis. Two types of mast cells are recognized, they are connective tissue mast cells and mucosal mast cells.

    Mast Cell References

      1. Prussin C, et al. (2003). IgE, mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils. J Allergy Clin Immunol 111(2 Suppl): S486–94.
      2. Ito A, et al. (2008) Nerve-mast cell and smooth muscle-mast cell interaction mediated by cell adhesion molecule-1, CADM1. Smooth Muscle Res. 44(2):83-93.
      3. Ryan JJ, et al. (2009) Mast cell modulation of the immune response. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 9(5):353-9.
      4. Crivellato E, et al. (2009) Mast cell contribution to tumor angiogenesis: a clinical approach. Eur Cytokine Netw. 20(4):197-206.
      5. Crivellato E, et al. (2009) Mast cell contribution to tumor angiogenesis: a clinical approach. Eur Cytokine Netw. 20(4):197-206.