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Human APP / Protease nexin-II Human Cells Transfected Lysate (positive control) (denatured)

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APP/PN2
Products Description:Human Cells transfected lysate in which Human APP / Protease nexin-II has been over-expressed. The whole cell lysate is provided in 1X Sample Buffer.
Host:Human
Preparation Method:Cell lysate was prepared by homogenization in ice-cold modified RIPA Lysis Buffer with cocktail of protease inhibitors (Sigma). Cell debris was removed by centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined with Bradford assay (Bio-Rad protein assay, Microplate Standard assay). The cell lysate was boiled for 5 minutes in 1 x SDS sample buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl pH 6.8, 12.5% glycerol, 1% sodium dodecylsulfate, 0.01% bromophenol blue) containing 5% b-mercaptoethanol, and lyophilized.
Lysis Buffer:Modified RIPA Lysis Buffer: 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 1mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% SDS, 1% Sodium deoxycholate, 1mM PMSF
Quality Control Testing:12.5% SDS-PAGE Stained with Coomassie Blue
Stability:Samples are stable for up to twelve months from date of receipt at -80℃
Recommend Usage:1. Centrifuge the tube for a few seconds and ensure the pellet at the bottom of the tube.
2. Re-dissolve the pellet using 200μL pure water and boiled for 2-5 min.
3. Store it at -80℃. Recommend to aliquot the cell lysate into smaller quantities for optimal storage. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
Notes:The lysate is ready to load on SDS-PAGE for Western blot application. If dissociating conditions are required, add reducing agent prior to heating.
Storage Buffer:In modified RIPA Lysis Buffer
Storage Instruction:Store at -80℃. Aliquot to avoid repeated freezing and thawing
Application notes:WB: Use at an assay dependent dilution.
Not yet tested in other applications.
Optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.
Background

Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein expressed in many tissues and concentrated in the synapses of neurons, and is suggested as a regulator of synapse formation and neural plasticity. APP can be processed by two different proteolytic pathways. In one pathway, APP is cleaved by β- and γ-secretase to produce the amyloid-β-protein (Aβ, Abeta, beta-amyloid) which is the principal component of the amyloid plaques, the major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while in the other pathway, α-secretase is involved in the cleavage of APP whose product exerts antiamyloidogenic effect and prevention of the Aβ peptide formation. The aberrant accumulation of aggregated beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) as plaques is a hallmark of AD neuropathology and reduction of Abeta has become a leading direction of emerging experimental therapies for the disease. Besides this pathological function of Abeta, recently published data reveal that Abeta also has an essential physiological role in lipid homeostasis. Cholesterol increases Abeta production, and conversely A beta production causes a decrease in cholesterol synthesis. Abeta may be part of a mechanism controlling synaptic activity, acting as a positive regulator presynaptically and a negative regulator postsynaptically. The pathological accumulation of oligomeric Abeta assemblies depresses excitatory transmission at the synaptic level, but also triggers aberrant patterns of neuronal circuit activity and epileptiform discharges at the network level. Abeta-induced dysfunction of inhibitory interneurons likely increases synchrony among excitatory principal cells and contributes to the destabilization of neuronal networks. There is evidence that beta-amyloid can impair blood vessel function. Vascular beta-amyloid deposition, also known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy, is associated with vascular dysfunction in animal and human studies. Alzheimer disease is associated with morphological changes in capillary networks, and soluble beta-amyloid produces abnormal vascular responses to physiological and pharmacological stimuli.

References
  • Grimm MO, et al. (2007) Amyloid beta as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. Trends Mol Med. 13(8): 337-44.
  • Smith EE, et al. (2009) Beta-amyloid, blood vessels, and brain function. Stroke. 40(7): 2601-6.
  • Gouras GK, et al. (2010) Intraneuronal beta-amyloid accumulation and synapse pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Acta Neuropathol. 119(5): 523-41.
  • Palop JJ, et al. (2010) Amyloid-beta-induced neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease: from synapses toward neural networks. Nat Neurosci. 13(7): 812-8.
  • Catalog:10703-H02HL-300
    List Price: $195.00  (Save $0.00)
    Price:$195.00      [How to order]
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