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H5N1 Influenza Pandemic Threat (Avian Flu)

H5N1 Influenza Pandemic Threat (Avian Influenza, Avian Flu)

Influenza A virus subtype H5N1, also known as "bird flu", A(H5N1) or simply H5N1, is a subtype of the influenza A virus which can cause illness in humans and many other animal species. A bird-adapted strain of H5N1, called HPAI A(H5N1) for "highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of type A of subtype H5N1", is the causative agent of H5N1 flu, commonly known as "avian influenza" or "Avian flu". H5N1 may mutate or reassort into a strain capable of efficient human-to-human transmission. The avian flu virus (H5N1 virus) is the world's largest current pandemic threat, and billions of dollars are being spent researching H5N1 and preparing for a potential influenza pandemic. The pandemic threat of influenza H5N1 (H5N1 flu, avian flu) Hemagglutinin (HA) or Neuraminidase (NA) proteins and HA antibodies were the main research tools for this influenza pandemic threat.

Avian Flu Overview

HPAI A(H5N1) is considered an avian disease, still, around 60% of humans known to have been infected with the current Asian strain of HPAI A(H5N1) have died from it, and H5N1 may mutate or reassort into a strain capable of efficient human-to-human transmission. In 2003, world-renowned virologist Robert G. Webster published an article titled "The world is teetering on the edge of a pandemic that could kill a large fraction of the human population" in American Scientist. He called for adequate resources to fight what he sees as a major world threat to possibly billions of lives. On September 29, 2005, David Nabarro, the newly appointed Senior United Nations System Coordinator for Avian and Human Influenza, warned the world that an outbreak of avian influenza could kill anywhere between 5 million and 150 million people. Experts have identified key events (creating new clades, infecting new species, spreading to new areas) marking the progression of an avian flu virus towards becoming pandemic, and many of those key events have occurred more rapidly than expected.

Due to the high lethality and virulence of HPAI A(H5N1), its endemic presence, its increasingly large host reservoir, and its significant ongoing mutations, the H5N1 virus is the world's largest current pandemic threat, and billions of dollars are being spent researching H5N1 and preparing for a potential influenza pandemic. At least 12 companies and 17 governments are developing prepandemic influenza vaccines in 28 different clinical trials that, if successful, could turn a deadly pandemic infection into a nondeadly one. Full-scale production of a vaccine that could prevent any illness at all from the strain would require at least three months after the virus's emergence to begin, but it is hoped that vaccine production could increase until one billion doses were produced by one year after the initial identification of the virus.

H5N1 may cause more than one influenza pandemic, as it is expected to continue mutating in birds regardless of whether humans develop herd immunity to a future pandemic strain. While genetic analysis of the H5N1 virus shows that influenza pandemics from its genetic offspring can easily be far more lethal than the Spanish flu pandemic, planning for a future influenza pandemic is based on what can be done and there is no higher Pandemic Severity Index level than a Category 5 pandemic which, roughly speaking, is any pandemic as bad as the Spanish flu or worse; and for which all intervention measures are to be used.

Avian Flu Symptoms

When the H5N1 strain infects humans, it will replicate in the lower respiratory tract, and consequently will cause viral pneumonia. There is as yet no human form of H5N1, so all humans who have caught it so far have caught avian H5N1. In general, humans who catch a humanized influenza A virus (a human flu virus of type A) usually have symptoms that include fever, cough, sore throat, muscle aches, conjunctivitis, and, in severe cases, breathing problems and pneumonia that may be fatal. The severity of the infection depends in large part on the state of the infected persons' immune systems and whether they had been exposed to the strain before (in which case they would be partially immune). No one knows if these or other symptoms will be the symptoms of a humanized H5N1 flu.

The reported mortality rate of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu in a human is high. On October 10, 2011 the WHO announced a total of 566 confirmed human cases which resulted in the deaths of 332 people since 2003. However, there is some evidence the actual mortality rate of avian flu could be much lower, as there may be many people with milder symptoms who do not seek treatment and are not counted.

H5N1 Vaccine

There are several H5N1 vaccines for several of the avian H5N1 varieties, but the continual mutation of H5N1 renders them of limited use to date: while vaccines can sometimes provide cross-protection against related flu strains, the best protection would be from a vaccine specifically produced for any future pandemic flu virus strain. Dr. Daniel Lucey, co-director of the Biohazardous Threats and Emerging Diseases graduate program at Georgetown University has made this point, "There is no H5N1 pandemic so there can be no pandemic vaccine". However, "pre-pandemic vaccines" have been created; are being refined and tested; and do have some promise both in furthering research and preparedness for the pandemic threat. Vaccine manufacturing companies are being encouraged to increase capacity so that if a pandemic vaccine is needed, facilities will be available for rapid production of large amounts of a vaccine specific to a new pandemic strain.

Avian Flu Virus–Hemagglutinin (HA) / Neraminidase (NA) Protein

The ability of various influenza strains to show species-selectivity is largely due to variation in the hemagglutinin genes. Genetic mutations in the hemagglutinin gene that cause single amino acid substitutions can significantly alter the ability of viral hemagglutinin proteins to bind to receptors on the surface of host cells. Such mutations in avian H5N1 viruses can change virus strains from being inefficient at infecting human cells to being as efficient in causing human infections as more common human influenza virus types. This doesn't mean that one amino acid substitution can cause a pandemic, but it does mean that one amino acid substitution can cause an avian flu virus that is not pathogenic in humans to become pathogenic in humans.

Some representative avian flu virus stains are: H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005; A/Vietnam/1203/2004; A/Vietnam/1194/2004; A/Hong Kong/483/97; A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005; H5N1, A/Indonesia/5/2005.

(1) H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005, Hemagglutinin & Neuraminidase

Product
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Species Molecule Description Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11048-V08H1
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA1 His Tag 11048-V08H2
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11048-V08H4
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA Mouse Fc-His 11048-V06H1
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA1 Native 11048-VNAH2
Product
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Species Molecule Description Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu Neuraminidase (NA) Protein
H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus NA Native 11676-VNAHC
H5N1 Avian Flu Neuraminidase (NA) Protein
H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus NA Native 11676-VNAHC1

(2) H5N1, A/Vietnam/1203/2004, Hemagglutinin

Product
(CLICK for detailed Info. and price)
Species Molecule Description Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Vietnam/1203/2004
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA1 Mouse Fc-His 10003-V06H1
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Vietnam/1203/2004
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA Mouse Fc-His 10003-V06H3
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Vietnam/1203/2004
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA2 Fc region of mouse IgG1 at the N-terminus 10003-V04H2

(3) H5N1, A/Vietnam/1194/2004, Hemagglutinin

Product
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Species Molecule Description Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Vietnam/1194/2004
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11062-V08H1
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Vietnam/1194/2004
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11062-V08H2

(4) H5N1, A/Hong Kong/483/97, Hemagglutinin

Product
(CLICK for detailed Info. and price)
Species Molecule Description Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Hong Kong/483/97
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11689-V08H
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Hong Kong/483/97
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA1 His Tag 11689-V08H1

(5) H5N1, A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005, Hemagglutinin

Product
(CLICK for detailed Info. and price)
Species Molecule Description Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11061-V08H1
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11061-V08H2

(6) H5N1, A/Indonesia/5/2005, Hemagglutinin

Product
(CLICK for detailed Info. and price)
Species Molecule Description Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Indonesia/5/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11060-V08H1
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Protein
H5N1, A/Indonesia/5/2005
H5N1 Avian Flu Virus HA His Tag 11060-V08H2

H5N1 Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody View antibody cross-reacting, click!

Product
(CLICK for detailed Info. and price)
Species Antibody Type Application Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Mouse MAb WB, ELISA, B/N 11048-MM01
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Mouse MAb WB, ELISA 11048-MM03
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Mouse MAb WB, ELISA 11048-MM04
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Mouse MAb WB 11048-MM05
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Mouse MAb ELISA 11048-MM06
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Mouse MAb WB, ELISA 11048-MM11
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Rabbit MAb WB, ELISA 11048-RM07
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Rabbit MAb WB, ELISA 11048-RM08
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Rabbit MAb WB, ELISA 11048-RM09
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Mouse MAb WB 11048-MM10
H5N1 Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) Antibody H5N1 Avian Flu Virus Rabbit PAb WB, ELISA 11048-RP02

Avian Flu Hemagglutinin (HA) ELISA Kit

A/Anhui/1/2005 & A/Indonesia/5/2005 & A/Vietnam/1194/2004

Product
(CLICK for detailed Info. and price)
Species Molecule Description Cat No
H5N1 Avian Flu (Avian Flu) Hemagglutinin (HA) ELISA Kit 22
H5N1, A/Anhui/1/2005 & A/Indonesia/5/2005 & A/Vietnam/1194/2004
Avian Flu H5N1 HA ELISA SEK002

Worldwide Influenza Pandemics

H5N1 Avian Flu Outbreak-Finish Time Death toll Subtype involved
Russian Flu 1889–1890 1 million possibly H2N2
Spanish Flu 1918–1920 50 million H1N1
Asian Flu 1957–1958 1.5 to 2 million H2N2
Hong Kong Flu 1968–1969 1 million H3N2
Swine Flu 2009–2010 over 18,209 novel H1N1

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Additional Influenza Research Reagents

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Influenza hemagglutinin (HA)
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Influednza nonstructural protein 1 (NS1)
Influenza nonstructural protein 2 (NS2)

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