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GM-CSF / CSF2 Protein, Antibody, ELISA Kit, cDNA Clone

Mouse GM-CSF / CSF2 Protein

Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
51048-M01H-20
51048-M01H-50
20 µg / $110
50 µg / $250
Add to Cart
Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
51048-M07H-20
51048-M07H-50
20 µg / $110
50 µg / $250
Add to Cart

Rat GM-CSF / CSF2 Protein

Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
80020-R07H-20
80020-R07H-50
20 µg / $110
50 µg / $240
Add to Cart
Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
80020-R01H-20
80020-R01H-50
20 µg / $110
50 µg / $240
Add to Cart

Human GM-CSF / CSF2 Protein

Description: Active
Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
10015-H01H-20
10015-H01H-50
20 µg / $110
50 µg / $260
Add to Cart
Description: Active
Expression host: Human Cells
  • Slide 1
10015-H07H-50
10015-H07H-20
50 µg / $260
20 µg / $110
Add to Cart

GM-CSF / CSF2 Related Areas

GM-CSF / CSF2 Related Pathways

GM-CSF / CSF2 Related Product

GM-CSF / CSF2 Related Information

GM-CSF / CSF2 Background

Gene Summary: GM-CSF is a cytokine that functions as a white blood cell growth factor. GM-CSF stimulates stem cells to produce granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and monocytes. Monocytes exit the circulation and migrate into tissue, whereupon they mature into macrophages and dendritic cells. Thus, it is part of the immune/inflammatory cascade, by which activation of a small number of macrophages can rapidly lead to an increase in their numbers, a process crucial for fighting infection. The active form of the protein is found extracellularly as a homodimer.
General information above from NCBI
Subunit structure: Monomer. The signaling GM-CSF receptor complex is a dodecamer of two head-to-head hexamers of two alpha, two beta, and two ligand subunits.
Subcellular location: Secreted.
Sequence similarities: Belongs to the GM-CSF family.
General information above from UniProt

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is one of an array of cytokines with pivotal roles in embryo implantation and subsequent development. Several cell lineages in the reproductive tract and gestational tissues synthesise GM-CSF under direction by ovarian steroid hormones and signalling agents originating in male seminal fluid and the conceptus. The pre-implantation embryo, invading placental trophoblast cells and the abundant populations of leukocytes controlling maternal immune tolerance are all subject to GM-CSF regulation. GM-CSF stimulates the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors to monocytes and neutrophils, and reduces the risk for febrile neutropenia in cancer patients. GM-CSF also has been shown to induce the differentiation of myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) that promote the development of T-helper type 1 (cellular) immune responses in cognate T cells. The active form of the protein is found extracellularly as a homodimer, and the encoding gene is localized to a related gene cluster at chromosome region 5q31 which is known to be associated with 5q-syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia. As a part of the immune/inflammatory cascade, GM-CSF promotes Th1 biased immune response, angiogenesis, allergic inflammation, and the development of autoimmunity, and thus worthy of consideration for therapeutic target. GM-CSF has been utilized in the clinical management of multiple disease processes. Most recently, GM-CSF has been incorporated into the treatment of malignancies as a sole therapy, as well as a vaccine adjuvant. While the benefits of GM-CSF in this arena have been promising, recent reports have suggested the potential for GM-CSF to induce immune suppression and, thus, negatively impact outcomes in the management of cancer patients. GM-CSF deficiency in pregnancy adversely impacts fetal and placental development, as well as progeny viability and growth after birth, highlighting this cytokine as a central maternal determinant of pregnancy outcome with clinical relevance in human fertility.

GM-CSF / CSF2 Altermative Names

GM-CSF / CSF2 Related Studies

  • Robertson SA. (2007) GM-CSF regulation of embryo development and pregnancy. Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 18(3-4): 287-98.
  • Waller EK. (2007) The role of sargramostim (rhGM-CSF) as immunotherapy. Oncologist. 12 Suppl 2: 22-6.
  • Clive KS, et al. (2010) Use of GM-CSF as an adjuvant with cancer vaccines: beneficial or detrimental? Expert Rev Vaccines. 9(5): 519-25.
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