CD299 (Protein | Antibody | cDNA Clone | ELISA Kit)

All CD299 reagents are produced in house and quality controlled, including 1 CD299 Antibody, 13 CD299 Gene, 2 CD299 Lysate, 2 CD299 Protein, 1 CD299 qPCR. All CD299 reagents are ready to use.

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CD299 Background

C-type lectin domain family 4, member M, also known as DC-SIGNR and CLEC4M, is a type II integral membrane protein that is 77% amino acid identical to DC-SIGN, an HIV gp12-binding protein. Though the encoded gene located in the same chromosome, DC-SIGN is expressed solely on dendritic cells, while DC-SIGNR is predominantly found in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and lymph node, as well as placental endothelium. DC-SIGNR exists as a homotetramer, and the tandem repeat domain, also called neck domain, mediates oligermerization. DC-SIGNR is ragarded as a pathogen-recognition receptor involved in peripheral immune surveillance in liver, and probably mediate the endocytosis of pathogens which are subsequently degraded in lysosomal compartments. DC-SIGNR appears to selectively recognize and bind many viral surface glycoproteins containing high mannose N-linked oligosaccharides in a calcium-dependent manner, including HIV-1 gp12, HIV-2 gp12, SIV gp12, ebolavirus glycoproteins, HCV E2, and human SARS coronavirus protein S, as well as the cellular adhesion protein ICAM3. DC-SIGNR have been thought to play an important role in establishing HIV infection by enhancing trans-infection of CD4(+)T cells in the regional lymph nodes. It may affect susceptibility to HIV infection by a mechanism that is different in females and males. DC-SIGNR can bind to hepatitis C virus (HCV), and its polymorphism might affect HCV loads supporting the concept that DC-SIGNR contributes to HCV replication efficacy.

CD299 References

  • Nattermann J, et al. (2006) The tandem-repeat polymorphism of the DC-SIGNR gene in HCV infection. J Viral Hepat. 13(1): 42-6.
  • Wichukchinda N, et al. (2007) The polymorphisms in DC-SIGNR affect susceptibility to HIV type 1 infection. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 23(5): 686-92.