Colony-Stimulating Factor (CSF) Background

Colony-Stimulating Factor (CSF) Definition
Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) are secreted glycoproteins. They bind to receptor proteins on the surfaces of hemopoietic stem cells. By doing this, CSFs activate intracellular signaling pathways that can cause the cells to proliferate and differentiate into a specific kind of blood cell (usually white blood cells. For red blood cell formation, see erythropoietin). Compared to other membrane-bound substances of the hematopoietic microenvironment, colony-stimulating factors are soluble. They transduce by paracrine, endocrine, or autocrine signaling. Colony-stimulating factors include CSF1, CSF2 and CSF3. Learn More.

Colony-Stimulating Factor (CSF) Function
Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) activate intracellular signaling pathways that can cause the cells to proliferate and differentiate into a specific kind of blood cell (usually white blood cells. For red blood cell formation, see erythropoietin). Learn More.

Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) Injection
G-CSF stimulates the production of white blood cells (WBC). In oncology and hematology, a recombinant form of G-CSF is used with certain cancer patients to accelerate recovery from neutropenia afterchemotherapy, allowing higher-intensity treatment regimens. G-CSF is also used to increase the number of hematopoietic stem cells in the blood of the donor before collection by leukapheresis for use in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Given G-CSF injection early after exposure to radiation may improve white blood cell counts, and G-CSF is stockpiled for use in radiation incidents. People who have been administered colony-stimulating factors do not have a higher risk of leukemia than people who have not.Learn More.

Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF) Drugs
GM-CSF can be used as a medication to stimulate the production of white blood cells following chemotherapy. GM-CSF is found in high levels in joints with rheumatoid arthritis and blocking GM-CSF may reduce the inflammation or damage. Some drugs (e.g. MOR103) are being developed to block GM-CSF. Learn More.

Colony-Stimulating Factor (CSF) References
  1. Sherr CJ. (1990) The colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor: pleiotropy of signal-response coupling. Lymphokine Res. 9(4): 543-8.
  2. Kacinski BM. (1997) CSF-1 and its receptor in breast carcinomas and neoplasms of the female reproductive tract. Mol Reprod Dev. 46(1): 71-4.
  3. Sapi E, et al. (1999) The role of CSF-1 in normal and neoplastic breast physiology. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 220(1): 1-8.
  4. Mitrasinovic OM, et al. (2005) Microglia overexpressing the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor are neuroprotective in a microglial-hippocampal organotypic coculture system. J Neurosci. 25 (17): 4442–51.
  5. Bonifer C, et al. (2008) The transcriptional regulation of the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor (csf1r) gene during hematopoiesis. Front Biosci. 13: 549-60.
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