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AKT1 Protein, Antibody, ELISA Kit, cDNA Clone

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AKT1 Related Pathways

AKT1 Related Product

    AKT1 Summary & Protein Information

    AKT1 Background

    Gene Summary: The serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the AKT1 gene is catalytically inactive in serum-starved primary and immortalized fibroblasts. AKT1 and the related AKT2 are activated by platelet-derived growth factor. The activation is rapid and specific, and it is abrogated by mutations in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1. It was shown that the activation occurs through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. In the developing nervous system AKT is a critical mediator of growth factor-induced neuronal survival. Survival factors can suppress apoptosis in a transcription-independent manner by activating the serine/threonine kinase AKT1, which then phosphorylates and inactivates components of the apoptotic machinery. Mutations in this gene have been associated with the Proteus syndrome. Multiple alternatively spliced transcript variants have been found for AKT1 gene.
    General information above from NCBI
    Catalytic activity: ATP + a protein = ADP + a phosphoprotein.
    Enzyme regulation: Three specific sites, one in the kinase domain (Thr-308) and the two other ones in the C-terminal regulatory region (Ser-473 and Tyr-474), need to be phosphorylated for its full activation. Inhibited by pyrrolopyrimidine inhibitors like aniline triazole and spiroindoline.
    Subunit structure: Interacts (via the C-terminus) with CCDC88A (via its C- terminus). Interacts with GRB10; the interaction leads to GRB10 phosphorylation thus promoting YWHAE-binding (By similarity). Interacts with AGAP2 (isoform 2/PIKE-A); the interaction occurs in the presence of guanine nucleotides. Interacts with AKTIP. Interacts (via PH domain) with MTCP1, TCL1A AND TCL1B. Interacts with CDKN1B; the interaction phosphorylates CDKN1B promoting 14-3- 3 binding and cell-cycle progression. Interacts with MAP3K5 and TRAF6. Interacts with BAD, PPP2R5B, STK3 and STK4. Interacts (via PH domain) with SIRT1. Interacts with SRPK2 in a phosphorylation- dependent manner. Interacts with RAF1. Interacts with TRIM13; the interaction ubiquitinates AKT1 leading to its proteasomal degradation. Interacts with TNK2 and CLK2. Interacts (via the C- terminus) with THEM4 (via its C-terminus). Interacts with and phosphorylated by PDPK1.
    Domain: Binding of the PH domain to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5- trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3) following phosphatidylinositol 3- kinase alpha (PIK3CA) activity results in its targeting to the plasma membrane. The PH domain mediates interaction with TNK2 and Tyr-176 is also essential for this interaction.
    The AGC-kinase C-terminal mediates interaction with THEM4.
    Subcellular location: Cytoplasm. Nucleus. Cell membrane. Note=Nucleus after activation by integrin-linked protein kinase 1 (ILK1). Nuclear translocation is enhanced by interaction with TCL1A. Phosphorylation on Tyr-176 by TNK2 results in its localization to the cell membrane where it is targeted for further phosphorylations on Thr-308 and Ser-473 leading to its activation and the activated form translocates to the nucleus.
    Tissue specificity: Expressed in prostate cancer and levels increase from the normal to the malignant state (at protein level). Expressed in all human cell types so far analyzed. The Tyr-176 phosphorylated form shows a significant increase in expression in breast cancers during the progressive stages i.e. normal to hyperplasia (ADH), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and lymph node metastatic (LNMM) stages.
    Post-translational: O-GlcNAcylation at Thr-305 and Thr-312 inhibits activating phosphorylation at Thr-308 via disrupting the interaction between AKT1 and PDPK1. O-GlcNAcylation at Ser-473 also probably interferes with phosphorylation at this site.
    Phosphorylation on Thr-308, Ser-473 and Tyr-474 is required for full activity. Activated TNK2 phosphorylates it on Tyr-176 resulting in its binding to the anionic plasma membrane phospholipid PA. This phosphorylated form localizes to the cell membrane, where it is targeted by PDPK1 and PDPK2 for further phosphorylations on Thr-308 and Ser-473 leading to its activation. Ser-473 phosphorylation by mTORC2 favors Thr-308 phosphorylation by PDPK1. Ser-473 phosphorylation is enhanced by interaction with AGAP2 isoform 2 (PIKE-A). Ser-473 phosphorylation is enhanced in focal cortical dysplasias with Taylor-type balloon cells. Ser-473 phosphorylation is enhanced by signaling through activated FLT3. Dephosphorylated at Thr-308 and Ser-473 by PP2A phosphatase. The phosphorylated form of PPP2R5B is required for bridging AKT1 with PP2A phosphatase.
    Ubiquitinated via 'Lys-48'-linked polyubiquitination by ZNRF1, leading to its degradation by the proteasome (By similarity). Ubiquitinated; undergoes both 'Lys-48'- and 'Lys-63'- linked polyubiquitination. TRAF6-induced 'Lys-63'-linked AKT1 ubiquitination is critical for phosphorylation and activation. When ubiquitinated, it translocates to the plasma membrane, where it becomes phosphorylated. When fully phosphorylated and translocated into the nucleus, undergoes 'Lys-48'- polyubiquitination catalyzed by TTC3, leading to its degradation by the proteasome. Also ubiquitinated by TRIM13 leading to its proteasomal degradation.
    Acetylated on Lys-14 and Lys-20 by the histone acetyltransferases EP300 and KAT2B. Acetylation results in reduced phosphorylation and inhibition of activity. Deacetylated at Lys-14 and Lys-20 by SIRT1. SIRT1-mediated deacetylation relieves the inhibition.
    Involvement in disease: Breast cancer (BC) [MIM:114480]: A common malignancy originating from breast epithelial tissue. Breast neoplasms can be distinguished by their histologic pattern. Invasive ductal carcinoma is by far the most common type. Breast cancer is etiologically and genetically heterogeneous. Important genetic factors have been indicated by familial occurrence and bilateral involvement. Mutations at more than one locus can be involved in different families or even in the same case. Note=Disease susceptibility is associated with variations affecting the gene represented in this entry.
    Colorectal cancer (CRC) [MIM:114500]: A complex disease characterized by malignant lesions arising from the inner wall of the large intestine (the colon) and the rectum. Genetic alterations are often associated with progression from premalignant lesion (adenoma) to invasive adenocarcinoma. Risk factors for cancer of the colon and rectum include colon polyps, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and genetic family history. Note=The gene represented in this entry may be involved in disease pathogenesis.
    Note=Genetic variations in AKT1 may play a role in susceptibility to ovarian cancer.
    Proteus syndrome (PROTEUSS) [MIM:176920]: A highly variable, severe disorder of asymmetric and disproportionate overgrowth of body parts, connective tissue nevi, epidermal nevi, dysregulated adipose tissue, and vascular malformations. Many features of Proteus syndrome overlap with other overgrowth syndromes. Note=The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry.
    Cowden syndrome 6 (CWS6) [MIM:615109]: A form of Cowden syndrome, a hamartomatous polyposis syndrome with age-related penetrance. Cowden syndrome is characterized by hamartomatous lesions affecting derivatives of ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal layers, macrocephaly, facial trichilemmomas (benign tumors of the hair follicle infundibulum), acral keratoses, papillomatous papules, and elevated risk for development of several types of malignancy, particularly breast carcinoma in women and thyroid carcinoma in both men and women. Colon cancer and renal cell carcinoma have also been reported. Hamartomas can be found in virtually every organ, but most commonly in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, breast and thyroid. Note=The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry.
    Sequence similarity: Belongs to the protein kinase superfamily. AGC Ser/Thr protein kinase family. RAC subfamily.
    Contains 1 AGC-kinase C-terminal domain.
    Contains 1 PH domain.
    Contains 1 protein kinase domain.
    General information above from UniProt

    v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1), or protein kinase B-alpha (PKB-ALPHA) is a serine-threonine protein kinase, belonging to the Protein Kinase Superfamily. AKT1 is a major mediator of the responses to insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), and glucose. AKT1 also plays a key role in the regulation of both muscle cell hypertrophy and atrophy. AKT1 activity is required for physiologic cardiac growth in response to IGF1 stimulation or exercise training. In contrast, AKT1 activity was found to antagonize pathologic cardiac growth that occurs in response to endothelin 1 stimulation or pressure overload. AKT1 selectively promotes physiological cardiac growth while AKT2 selectively promotes insulin-stimulated cardiac glucose metabolism. AKT1 deletion prevented tumor initiation as well as tumor progression, coincident with decreased Akt signaling in tumor tissues. AKT1 is the primary Akt isoform activated by mutant K-ras in lung tumors, and that AKT3 may oppose AKT1 in lung tumorigenesis and lung tumor progression. A number of separate studies have implicated AKT1 as an inhibitor of breast epithelial cell motility and invasion. AKT1 may have a dual role in tumorigenesis, acting not only pro-oncogenically by suppressing apoptosis but also anti-oncogenically by suppressing invasion and metastasis.

    AKT1 Alternative Name

    AKT,AKT1,MGC99656,PKB,PKB-ALPHA,PRKBA,RAC,RAC-ALPHA,RAC-PK-alpha, [human]
    Akt,Akt1,PKB,PKB/Akt,PKBalpha,Rac, [mouse]

    AKT1 Related Studies

  • Hollander MC, et al. (2011) Akt1 deletion prevents lung tumorigenesis by mutant K-ras. Oncogene. 30(15): 1812-21.
  • Devaney JM, et al. (2011) AKT1 polymorphisms are associated with risk for metabolic syndrome. Hum Genet. 129(2): 129-39.
  • Dillon RL, et al. (2010) Distinct biological roles for the akt family in mammary tumor progression. Cancer Res. 70(11): 4260-4.
  • Toker A, et al. (2006) Akt signaling and cancer: surviving but not moving on. Cancer Res. 66(8): 3963-6.
  • Muslin AJ, et al. (2006) Role of Akt in cardiac growth and metabolism. Novartis Found Symp. 274: 118-26.
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